Konferenzen – Call for Papers

Workshop "Without alternatives?! Challenging political-economic dogmas in the field of health and healing"

Human health and well-being are closely contingent upon economic ideologies and political dogmas, and health professionals as well as policy makers in all parts of the world have long contended about how to organize equitable health care.

  • Zeitraum: 29.09.2019 – 02.10.2019
  • Institution: Universität Konstanz
  • Ort: Konstanz / Deutschland
  • Anmeldung bis: 15. Februar 2019
  • Zusätzliche Unterlagen: Please submit both a long version (max. 1,200 characters including spaces) and a short version (max. 300 characters including spaces)
  • Unterlagen an: claudia.lang@inserm.fr and dominik.mattes@fu-berlin.de
Human health and well-being are closely contingent upon economic 
ideologies and political dogmas, and health professionals as well as 
policy makers in all parts of the world have long contended about how to 
organize equitable health care. Historically, both excessive neoliberal 
agendas and socialist processes of enforced communization have had 
disastrous effects on affected people?s physical and mental health. 
And more recently, nationalist-oriented actors push for drastic 
cutbacks of international (development) aid and prioritize service 
provision for particular populations within ?their own? countries, 
thus exacerbating unequal access to health care ?at home? and abroad. 
Such different approaches are often presented as being without 
alternative, i.e. as unnegotiable in face of previous failures and 
specific political and financial constraints. 
We invite papers that ethnographically explore how such logics of 
lacking alternatives are created, conveyed, defended, and 
(in)validated. What are the implications for the structuring of health 
systems, practices and ethics of caregiving, involved social relations 
and moral normativities, and individual experiences of suffering? How 
do such logics relate to the notion of health (care) as a fundamental 
human right and public good? What are the consequences in terms of the 
commodification of health and the (re)distribution of responsibilities 
for its maintenance and promotion? Which disparities regarding access 
to therapeutic means and innovation do they tackle but also engender? 
We further wish to attend to the sites and workings of resistance to 
such forms of discursive and practical closure: Where and how are 
respective logics contested and practically levered out? How and to 
what effect do patients, health practitioners, and policy makers 
maintain their openness to think and act alternatively in their 
endeavor to sustain and support their own and others? health and 
well-being?

Permanentlink
Zurück zur Übersicht